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Wednesday morning, members of several different air quality groups gathered in downtown Pittsburgh to stage a “play-in” with their children to draw attention to air quality issues in our city. The event coincided with a major coke production technology conference happening in downtown. Here’s what they had to say.




October 28, 2015

Trisha Sheehan, Moms Clean Air Force, (856) 796-0300


Local Health and Environmental Leaders Call for Action to Protect Allegheny County Families from Air Pollution


“Play-in” brings together families, health experts and advocates supporting clean air as coke manufacturing convention rolls into Pittsburgh


Pittsburgh, Pa. – Health and environmental advocates from throughout Allegheny County came together this morning in downtown Pittsburgh to draw attention to the negative health impact air pollution has on local families – and to urge policymakers and business leaders to take action. Pittsburgh ranks as one of the top 10 most polluted cities in the nation with regard to short- and long-term particle pollution, according to an annual survey from the American Lung Association. That kind of pollution can increase the risk of heart and lung disease, adverse birth outcomes, cancer and premature death.


Today’s event coincided with the Met Coke 2015 convention, a gathering of leaders in the coke, coal and steel industries. Attendees at the conference plan to discuss how technology and innovation can shape the coke manufacturing industry. The Environmental Protection Agency classifies the toxins from coke manufacturing emissions as among the most toxic, labeling it a carcinogen.


The largest coke plant in the country – U.S. Steel Clairton Coke Works – is right here in Allegheny County.


“Two years ago, the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health reported that residents of Allegheny County are facing a cancer risk twice – and in some cases, even 20 – times higher than those living in surrounding areas due to air pollution,” said Dr. Marsha Haley, a radiation oncologist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. “That’s an astounding statistic, and it carries undeniable consequences for our public health. If we are serious about improving the health of our families, industry workers, and especially our children, we must address the pollution coming from coke facilities and other industrial plants in our area.”



“I love living in the Pittsburgh area – it’s my family’s home, and there’s nowhere else I’d want to raise my children. But parents like me shouldn’t have to worry every day about the quality of air our kids are breathing,” said Patrice Tomcik, an organizer with Moms Clean Air Force. “We know that many of the industrial facilities in this region pump toxins into the air that make people sick, and we know that many of these facilities do not regularly comply with the health guidelines meant to keep all of us safe. It’s time for that to change – our kids deserve better.”




Earlier this week, the PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center issued a “Toxic Ten” report, which found that more than one-third of Allegheny County residents live within just three miles of 10 industrial facilities responsible for pumping at least 1.4 million pounds of toxic pollutants into the air in 2013. The emissions from these Toxic Ten facilities include chromium, manganese, and benzene – toxins that can cause an array of health problems including cancer.




“The Pittsburgh region is home to the highest density concentration of coke manufacturing operations anywhere in the United States,” said Dr. Albert Presto, a Carnegie Mellon University researcher with significant expertise in mapping the spread of toxic emissions in and around Pittsburgh. “We also know that the highest levels of air pollutants in Allegheny County are recorded at the monitors near the Shenango and Clairton coke works. It’s not just the hundreds of thousands of people who live in the shadow of these facilities who are exposed – toxins form plumes that can travel miles through the air, making this a problem about which every single person living in our region should be concerned.”




“It’s ironic that Pittsburgh is chosen to highlight the success of coke-making when the coke plants in our backyard are regularly violating the health standards put in place to protect our communities,” said Cassi Steenblok, Program Organizer for Clean Water Action. “We work with people throughout the Mon Valley who are forced to live with the health effects of being in a region consistently among the worst in the nation for air quality because of a local coke plant. These facilities need to recognize the effect they are having on our health and the environment and take an active role in cleaning up their acts.”


“Today’s event shows that families throughout the Pittsburgh region are rightfully taking air pollution seriously,” said Stephen Riccardi, with PennEnvironment. “Our Toxic Ten report, released earlier this week, shows that one in three individuals live within a three-mile radius of Allegheny County’s most toxic air polluters. This has implications for all of us and our families, and we all need to work together if we’re serious about making Pittsburgh the Most Livable City.”



“We continue to be concerned about the health implications that toxic emissions from local coke plants have on families all across Allegheny County,” said Rachel Filippini, Executive Director of the Group Against Smog and Pollution (GASP). “The best and brightest minds in the coke industry are in Pittsburgh right now talking about opportunities for and challenges to their industry. I hope they take this unique opportunity to talk about technologies, work practices, and innovations that could reduce their emissions and the serious impact they have on Pittsburghers’ health and quality of life.”


This morning, PennEnvironment released a report outlining the top 10 air toxics polluters in Allegheny County. These businesses are all over the county, affecting some 400,000 people who live within three miles of them.


Area air quality groups responded to the report with calls for action. Here’s what they said:



October 26, 2015

Mollie Simon, Clean Air Council



New Report Calls Out the Worst Industrial Sources of Air Pollution in Allegheny County


Hundreds of thousands of families across Allegheny County live in the shadows of ‘Toxic Ten’ facilities


Pittsburgh, Pa. – More than one-third of Allegheny County residents live within a three-mile radius of 10 industrial facilities responsible for pumping at least 1.4 million pounds of toxic pollutants into the air in 2013, according to a new report from the PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center. The report, “Toxic Ten: The Allegheny County Polluters that Are Fouling Our Air and Threatening Our Health,” exposes the chronic refusal of many of the region’s industrial facilities to comply with guidelines from the Allegheny County Health Department that are meant to keep everyone safe.


The PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center used industry-reported data from the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) on the amount and type of emissions from area facilities to determine which posed the greatest hazard to the health of nearby citizens. The emissions from these Toxic Ten industrial facilities include chromium, manganese, and benzene – toxins that can cause an array of health problems including cancer. It’s not just a hazard for the residents living in the shadows of these facilities. Toxic pollutants can travel a variety of distances, with studies showing some pollutants traveling more than 10 miles.


A number of the region’s leading medical and environmental experts are speaking out about the new report:


“We know that these toxins that are released into the air contribute to a variety of adverse health effects in both children and adults, including cancer and asthma as well as other problems,” said Dr. Deborah Gentile, an allergist-immunologist with Allegheny General Hospital. “Pittsburgh’s asthma rates exceed the national average, and one of the potential reasons why is because of the toxic emissions the facilities cited in this report release into the air we all breathe, each and every day. Other factors such as obesity, nutrition, infections, tobacco smoke exposure and poverty also play a role in asthma. We have not conquered our asthma problem in this region yet and one of the factors that we must address is how we can make the air we all breathe cleaner.”


Aviva Diamond of Moms Clean Air Force added, “Allegheny County has some of the worst air quality in the nation. The very air our children breathe is dangerous to their health and well-being. There is simply no more time to continue taking baby steps to address polluters – the Allegheny County Health Department must enforce existing regulations to keep our children safe and healthy.”


“This report provides clear evidence that we all need to come together – ACHD, community members, environmental health advocates and other NGO organizations and businesses – to take the needed steps and clean up our air throughout the region. With so many of our community members living right near a Toxic Ten facility, we know this is negatively impacting the health, welfare and quality of life of nearly everyone who calls Allegheny County home,” said Clean Air Council Executive Director and Chief Counsel Joe Minott.


The Toxic Ten report comes as some of the biggest names in the coke industry descend on Pittsburgh for the Met Coke 2015 convention this week. Experts and researchers will be gathering to discuss how technology and innovation can inform coke manufacturing moving forward. Coke is a highly-refined and processed form of coal, and it is one of the main materials needed to manufacture steel. The Environmental Protection Agency describes coke emissions as among the most toxic of all air pollutants, and classifies it as a carcinogen.


The country’s largest coke producer is right here in Allegheny County. About 37,000 people live within three miles of U.S. Steel Clairton Coke Works, and the facility has been in near-constant violation of health guidelines since 2012.


“If Pittsburgh is going to truly become the most livable city we, as an entire region, need to think harder about not only what type of jobs we want to attract, but what it will take to attract those jobs. Quality of life for Allegheny County residents is reflected in the quality of the air that we breathe,” said George Jugovic, Chief Council with PennFuture. “Regulations to protect public health aren’t at odds with a vibrant workforce, they strengthen it.”


“We often hear from residents throughout the Mon Valley who are dealing with the health and environmental effects associated with poor air quality. Whether they are in Clairton, Liberty, or West Elizabeth one thing is the same – poor air quality is impacting the health and standard of living for all residents,” said Cassi Steenblok, Program Organizer for Clean Water Action. “This report comes as no surprise and just further proves the need for the county to get tough on air pollution.”


“This report highlights what the thousands of families living in the shadow of DTE Shenango Coke Works have known for far too long: these facilities simply don’t follow the regulations in place that are meant to keep our families safe and healthy,” said Thaddeus Popovich, with the citizens’ group Allegheny County Clean Air Now (ACCAN). “It’s time for facilities like Shenango to recognize that they operate in communities that thousands of people call home. That means they have to play by the rules.”


Jamin Bogi, Policy and Outreach Coordinator at Group Against Smog and Pollution (GASP) said, “This report adds further evidence to bolster our concern about McConway & Torley’s foundry in Lawrenceville, which has the most people living within three miles of its facility compared to others on the list. There has been a fence line monitor at M&T for years, but we know their metal emissions are still worrisome. It’s time for action to reduce these toxic emissions.”



This morning, PennEnvironment, a statewide group that works on several issues, include air quality, released their assessment of the worst air toxics offenders in Allegheny County. These businesses are everywhere in the county, from Bridgeville to Neville Island to Lawrenceville and the rankings are based on their own reporting to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.



PennEnvironment announced the release of their Toxic Ten air toxic polluters in Allegheny County on Oct. 26, 2015. They were joined by several other air quality advocates, including Clean Water Action, Allegheny County Clean Air Now and the Sierra Club. They were also joined by residents of the county who live near one of the 10 polluters.

One of their big findings: More than 1/3 of Allegheny County’s 1.2 million residents live within three miles of one of these polluters. Why does that matter? Because air moves, and even if a polluter isn’t in your backyard, what it releases into the air will eventually get there.

A woman who lives near Cheswick Power Plant shows photos of her experience living near a major point source of pollution in Allegheny County.

A woman who lives near Cheswick Power Plant shows photos of her experience living near a major point source of pollution in Allegheny County.


Use this interactive map to see how close you are to the Toxic Ten.




Breathe Project gets lots of messages from people like you – concerned, proactive folks wanting to do more to clean up the air in southwest Pennsylvania.


Whether you have just a couple of hours to spare each week, or are looking for full- and part-time internships, there are tons of organizations in our area that want to meet you. Most of the internship opportunities will be unpaid, but in many cases, you can get college credit.


So, check them out, learn more about what they do, and use the contact information below to get involved! We’re all in this together. We all deserve to breathe clean air.



Sierra Club

Sierra Club is always looking for interns and volunteers. They’ll meet with you over coffee, talk about what you’d like to do, and work from there.


Email Randy Francisco,




Clean Water Action is not just about waterways – they work on air quality issues as well. You meet with staffers and work together to create an experience that benefits you both.

Contact Cassi Steenblok,, or Steve Hvozdovich





The American Lung Association takes volunteers and interns. Along with funding research and advocating for clean air and healthy lungs, the American Lung Association is well known for State of the Air, their yearly air quality report for the United States.


Contact Paige Dewhirst,



Fair Shake

Fair Shake Environmental Legal Services works on environmental justice issues with clients of modest means in Pennsylvania and Ohio. They offer internships in several different areas and are looking for people with undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees in subjects/fields such as law, public policy, environmental science, environmental engineering, technology and communications.


Contact Oday Salim for Pennsylvania opportunities at

Contact James Yskamp for Ohio opportunities at






Penn Future does great work around Pittsburgh’s air quality issues. They take interns and volunteers and are looking for attorneys, people to help with outreach and communications, and folks with experience or an interest in local air quality, shale gas, local government and implementation of the Clean Power Plan.


Contact George Jugovic,




Women for a Healthy Environment works on lots of issues, including air quality in the Pittsburgh area. They are looking for interns or volunteers with experience or education in the following areas: communications, education, environmental studies, sustainability, public policy and public health.


Contact Michelle Naccarati-Chapkis,





Clean Air Council is looking for volunteers and interns to help with canvassing in the Mon Valley, and for educational outreach on major point source pollution. They work on everything from pipelines to point sources.


Contact Mollie Simon,





GASP (Group Against Smog and Pollution) works on many projects in the Pittsburgh area, from litigation concerning point sources to educational campaigns to reduce idling school buses and diesel vehicles. Interns candidates will meet with staff to create a program that benefits both the candidate and GASP. Volunteers will receive appropriate training for projects as they arise.


Contact Jamin Bogi,






Penn Environment is a statewide organization that deals with many issues, including air quality. Interns will work on outreach projects, building new coalitions and working on existing coalitions. They will help recruit volunteers, plan events and work on media projects. Volunteers will work on citizen outreach projects and events.


Contact Stephen Riccardi,

Researchers at Pitt took a look at births in southwest Pennsylvania and found a link between exposure to chromium and styrene and autism.


The study is here. We’re going to do our best to summarize it below.


Who did the study?

The study leader is Evelyn Talbot. She’s an epidemiologist in the public health school at Pitt. Epidemiologists try to establish cause and effect for disease, but often, they are also looking for correlations – things that have a relationship to each other, but aren’t necessarily cause and effect. A correlation is what they say they have found in this paper.

Children playing in the shadow of the coal-fired power plant in Cheswick.

Children playing in the shadow of the coal-fired power plant in Cheswick.

Who was in the study?

Talbot’s team took a look at the medical history and talked to the moms of 217 children born between 2005 and 2009 who have a diagnosis on the autism spectrum. These kids live in Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Washington or Westmoreland Counties. The researchers also looked at a similar number of children who weren’t on the autism spectrum and interviewed their moms. They also compared their findings to thousands of births in the area, but there were no interviews.


Um, 217 kids doesn’t seem like a lot. Is it?

Is 217 enough to do a study? The authors said that based on predictions of the number of children born in these counties in those years, they wanted to enroll about half the number predicted to have ASD (autism spectrum disorder). That would be 250 children. Pretty close!


How do you know the kids were exposed to anything?

The team used computer models based on pollution data collected by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to predict the actual exposure of each kid in the study based on addresses during the study period. They looked at 30 different air toxics that are found in southwestern PA that have been known to effect development, our nervous systems or our hormone systems.


And they found what?

Of the 30 different air toxics they looked at (things like benzene, arsenic and lead), they found a pretty strong correlation between developing autism and exposure to styrene, an oily chemical that ends up in plastics and chromium, a metal that is sometimes used in steel production.


Now what?

The study is just the beginning, but since we already know that exposure to pollution can impact children and adults, the authors think that following up with monitoring the levels of styrene and chromium in the air can give us more data to better understand individual outcomes. One surprising thing is that we have no autism registry in PA. Given the number of people studying the disorders, and the list of potential causes, the researchers are calling on the state, if not the nation, to start a registry.



Something you have to see – a photo exhibit of lives and air pollution in Southwest Pittsburgh. Starting Friday, Sept. 18 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers.

A child playing with fireworks. A significant source of pollution.

A child playing with fireworks. A significant source of pollution.


For the past year, local artists have used photography and interviews to try and visual thesocial, political, economic and health impacts of air pollution in the greater Pittsburgh area. We live in a region with about a dozen air quality monitors, gathering data about what we breathe. And guess what, nearly all of them record numbers in the worst one-third of the nation.

Children playing in the shadow of the coal-fired power plant in Cheswick.

Children playing in the shadow of the coal-fired power plant in Cheswick. This is one of the photos to be on exhibit at Pittsburgh Filmmakers from Sept. 18 through Feb. 26, 2016.

You can’t see air, but in this project all are the ways that you feel its impact. Make a night of it. Go.

Sept. 18, 2015 through Feb. 26, 2016

477 Melwood, Pittsburgh, 15213


News about the proposed Shell ethane cracker in Beaver County: the Clean Air Council and the Environmental Integrity Project are appealing the permit given by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Why? Because, they say, the permit isn’t protective enough, and is violation of the federal Clean Air Act.


The ethane cracker would be in Monaca, which already is dealing with poor air quality that doesn’t meet federal standards. The new cracker would be a major point source for pollution.


In case you were curious, here’s ethane cracker 101: The facility will take a chemical called ethane, which is a component of one type of natural gas that comes from fracking, and convert it into polyethylene through a couple of chemical reactions that take the gas and eventually convert it into long chains of a similar repeating structure. Polyethylene is used in a lot of industrial processes, including making plastic that goes into everything from grocery bags to test tubes.


For ethane cracker 102, click here.




Here’s the news release:



August 4, 2015


Clean Air Council and Environmental Integrity Project Challenge PA Department of Environmental Protection’s Approval of Shell Ethane Cracker Permit


The Council and Environmental Integrity Project’s appeal of the permit follows their filing of comments recommending stronger pollution controls and air pollution monitoring. The DEP’s approval of Shell’s permit does not conform with the Clean Air Act.


Philadelphia, PA – Yesterday the Clean Air Council and the Environmental Integrity Project appealed a state permit for a proposed petrochemical plant northwest of Pittsburgh that would allow the construction of a major source of air pollution in an area that already exceeds federal air quality standards set to protect human health.


The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) in June approved of a plan by Shell Chemical Appalachia LLC for a new petrochemical facility called an “ethane cracker” in Monaca, Beaver County, PA, that would process ethane from Marcellus Shale natural gas to produce polyethylene for plastic products.


The environmental groups are appealing the permit to the Pennsylvania Environmental Hearing Board because DEP did not comply with the minimum requirements of the federal Clean Air Act and Pennsylvania’s State Implementation Plan.


“Shell’s proposed air pollution controls for the facility are inadequate and do not provide the residents of Beaver County with the most protective pollution technology controls, which have been implemented at similar Shell facilities and other petrochemical plants in other parts of the country,” said Joseph Otis Minott, Esq. Chief Counsel, Executive Director of the Clean Air Council.


”Ozone levels in Beaver County already exceed levels that are safe for human health, causing excess risk of asthma and other serious respiratory diseases.   Shell must monitor and control the facility’s emissions of volatile organic compounds, an ozone precursor, as much as possible to comply with the Clean Air Act and to protect the health of the surrounding communities,” said Sparsh Khandeshi, an attorney for the Environmental Integrity Project.


The facility will be a major source of air pollution in Beaver County, an area that is currently designated as nonattainment for ozone and PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The groups argue that DEP has not required Shell to install equipment, such as fence-line monitoring, that would detect leaks and help achieve and ensure the lowest achievable emission rate.


The lawsuit also challenges Shell’s representation of the amount of volatile organic compounds that will be released from flaring. Without these needed controls, the groups believe that residents and communities in the Beaver County area would be harmed by the operation of the Shell Petrochemical Facility.


Clean Air Council is a member-supported, non-profit environmental organization dedicated to protecting everyone’s right to breathe clean air. The Council works through public education, community advocacy, and government oversight to ensure enforcement of environmental laws.


The Environmental Integrity Project is nonpartisan, nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C., dedicated to advocating for more effective enforcement of environmental laws. EIP has three goals: (1) to provide objective analyses of how the failure to enforce or implement environmental laws increases pollution and affects public health; (2) to hold federal and state agencies, as well as individual corporations, accountable for failing to enforce or comply with environmental laws; and (3) to help local communities obtain the protection of environmental laws.


Hey folks – big news today out of PennEnvironment – they’ve filed their intent to sue ArcelorMittal, the global steel company, for what they describe as hundreds of violations of the Clean Air Act out of their plant in Monessen, south of Pittsburgh.


PennEnvironment held a press conference today to discuss the pending suit, with people who live in the neighborhood talking about how hard it is to live by the plant. The full text of their press release is below.



ArcelorMittal’s Pittsburgh-area Plant Commits Hundreds of Clean Air Act Violations, Raining Soot and Foul Odors on Local Residents


[PITTSBURGH, PA] – At a news conference held in front of the federal courthouse in downtown Pittsburgh, representatives of the citizen-based non-profit group PennEnvironment announced they’re taking the required steps to trigger a lawsuit against the world’s largest steel company, ArcelorMittal, to address hundreds of ongoing violations of the federal Clean Air Act.


The suit would address a wide variety of alleged problems at ArcelorMittal USA, Inc.’s Monessen Coke Plant, located twenty-five miles south of Pittsburgh on the banks of the Monongahela River. Local residents say the plant is fouling the air over a wide swath of southwestern Pennsylvania.


The required pre-suit notice letter, sent on behalf of PennEnvironment and its members to ArcelorMittal, as well as to state and federal regulators, alleges that residents of numerous nearby towns surrounding the plant have been showered with soot, acidic gases, and noxious odors since the idled, decades-old facility re-started in April 2014. These include the municipalities of Monessen, Donora, Monongahela, and Carroll Township, located in both Westmoreland and Washington counties.


A view of the ArcelorMittal plant in Monessen. Photo by Logan Tilley


“I’ve met with residents who live in towns all around this plant, and their stories about air pollution from this facility are gut-wrenching,” said David Masur, Executive Director of PennEnvironment. “Ever since the Monessen Coke Plant re-opened last year, local residents have had their quality of life diminished, have endured ongoing odors and soot, and have had to fear for their health and the health of their families. This is appalling and unacceptable.”


“The smell that emanates from the Monessen plant is consistently foul and sometimes so suffocating that I feel like a prisoner in my own home. I only get relief from these odors and pollution when I leave the area,” said Viktoryia Maroz, a resident of Donora, PA.


Photos of the facility can be viewed at hC4l. If using photos to accompany a news story, please credit as, “Logan Tilley.”


The Clean Air Act’s “citizen suit” provision allows private individuals and organizations to sue violators in federal court after first providing 60 days’ notice of their intent to file suit and of the violations to be addressed in the suit.


The Monessen plant’s 56 coke battery ovens heat coal at high temperatures to produce nearly 1,000 tons per day of “coke,” a form of carbon that is added to molten iron to produce steel. Coke from the Monessen plant is shipped to ArcelorMittal’s various North American steel mills.


The production of coke creates massive amounts of toxic, chemical-laden gases and fine particulate pollutants that, if not properly contained and treated, can cause serious environmental and public health problems when released to the surrounding environment.


The notice letter alleges a wide range of violations at ArcelorMittal’s Monessen plant, including:


• Operating the plant for days and weeks at a time while a key air pollution control device was out of service;
• Approximately 200 violations of the facility’s pollution limits for hydrogen sulfide (a toxic gas with a foul odor), sulfur dioxide (a respiratory irritant and contributor to acid rain), and particulate matter (which can lodge in the lungs and exacerbate respiratory problems);
• Failure to install a mandatory monitoring device needed to track the amount of hydrogen sulfide coming from the facility’s smokestacks.


At times, violations have been so egregious that ArcelorMittal’s emission levels have been up to eight times higher than the legally allowable limits.


ArcelorMittal USA, Inc., is headquartered in Chicago. Its parent company is headquartered in Luxembourg and has annual revenues of over $80 billion.


PennEnvironment’s lawsuit will be filed by the non-profit attorneys at the National Environmental Law Center (NELC), in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania, located in Pittsburgh. The lawsuit will seek a court order requiring the Monessen Coke Plant to comply with its Clean Air Act permit, and civil penalties against ArcelorMittal to punish it for past violations and to deter future violations.


A separate class-action lawsuit (unrelated to the suit announced today by PennEnvironment) has been filed against ArcelorMittal’s Monessen Coke Plant, seeking monetary damages for residents suffering from noxious odors and soot.


“It’s outrageous that the world’s largest steel company, which brings in $80 billion annually, can’t find a way to comply with our cornerstone environmental laws and ensure the health and safety of nearby residents,” stated Masur. “That’s anything but being a good corporate neighbor.”




PennEnvironment is a citizen-funded, statewide environmental advocacy organization. For more information about this or other PennEnvironment campaigns, please visit our website at


The National Environmental Law Center (NELC) is a non-profit environmental litigation group. NELC will be joined in the lawsuit by attorney David Nicholas of Newton, Massachusetts, and Pittsburgh attorney Thomas Farrell of Farrell & Reisinger, LLC.

Today, the State Department of Environmental Resources has issued a “code orange” alert.  The air quality index is expected to enter the range of 101 to 150 for Pittsburgh, the Liberty-Clairton area in southeastern Allegheny County, and Indiana County.  This level of pollution puts young children, the elderly and people with respiratory problems in danger.
Click on the link above to watch a short video clip to see what a code orange day in Pittsburgh looks like.
Read more about this alert in today’s Post Gazette.

Did you see John Graham’s Op-Ed in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette last week? If not, click here. John, who is a senior scientist with the Clean Air Task Force, studies air quality here in Western PA.



A screenshot of the American Lung Association’s State of the Air 2015 report. Pittsburgh ranks in the top 10 for high levels of very small particles in the air. These particles can cause health problems.

The American Lung Association recently released their rankings of air quality nationwide. We are still in the top 10 for worst daily and yearly PM2.5 readings, even though we have been improving.


After the PG and others took the American Lung Association to task for basing their rankings on one monitor in our area, John said, hang on. Yes, that one monitor, the Liberty-Clairton monitor, gives really bad readings, but it’s not the only one.


Pittsburgh’s air is bad. Most of our monitors give readings in the bottom one-third of air quality in the nation. Think about it. Six hundred monitors nation wide. Two hundred in the bottom one-third. Most of Western PA’s one dozen monitors fall on that list.


Yes, it’s getting better, but the problem isn’t over. Is better air really good enough?


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