Mail Icon Facebook Icon Twitter Icon Share
NEWS & EVENTS Subscribe to rss news feed  

By Thaddeus Popovich,
Allegheny County Clean Air Now co-founder

 

In January 2016, the Shenango coke plant, six miles down the Ohio River from Pittsburgh, shut down after producing coke for 54 years. It had operated a battery of 56 ovens, which each year produced 350,000 tons of coke, the fuel used in steelmaking.

 

About 170 workers lost their jobs because of the closing, a sobering result of the decision by DTE Energy, a Detroit-based, diversified energy company, to shutter the plant because of the global steel industry’s “overcapacity.” But for many people who lived near the plant, the clearer skies and cleaner air of the past year have been a welcomed relief for them and their families and a testament to their determination to improve the quality of life in their community.

 

For decades, Shenango’s coke-making process – filling an oven with coal, baking it at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit for18 hours, then removing the coke and dousing it with water to cool – created hazardous byproducts such as fine particulates and the carcinogenic air toxins benzene, xylene and toluene. Federal and Allegheny County Health Department officials issued numerous consent degrees and orders because of violations of air and water quality regulations. A 2014 county decree, for example, covered 330 days of air quality violations over a 432-day period that ended Sept. 30, 2013. Also in 2014, the advocacy nonprofit GASP – Group Against Smog and Pollution – filed a citizens lawsuit against Shenango.

 

Meanwhile, residents of nearby communities like Avalon, Bellevue, Ben Avon and Emsworth became more and more impatient. They were tired of air that smelled at times like rotten eggs, with a distinct whiff of partially burnt coal. They grew weary of the blanket of hazy bad air that seemed to hang over the valley more often than not. And they were frustrated that regulatory agencies seemed ineffective in controlling the problem.

 

That’s why a group of us in the area formed an informal grass roots association called Allegheny County Clean Air Now (ACCAN). Some of us became certified emissions evaluators to watch Shenango and report on harmful emissions. We organized meetings within the community and met with the Health Department on a regular basis. We traveled to the federal Environmental Protection Agency’s Region III headquarters in Philadelphia to meet with Regional Administrator Shawn Garvin and his staff to request their help. We obtained resolutions from our municipalities requesting that the Health Department strictly enforce regulations, and we presented a petition requesting the same, signed by a consortium of businesses, churches and other local organizations.

 

ACCAN also worked with local media and set up a social media network to increase broad public awareness of the problem. We engaged with Carnegie Mellon University’s CREATE Lab – Community Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment – which helped us set up a 24/7 video monitor of the plant and distribute Speck air quality monitors to homes and businesses in the surrounding community to confirm the presence of fine particulates. And we created a stories project to detail the before-and-after effects of more than 20 individuals affected by the Shenango coke plant.

 

We have found that since Shenango shut down, the improvement in air quality has been significant. In the first quarter of 2015, the Health Department received 109 complaints from the surrounding communities versus 13 complaints during the first quarter of 2016, an 88 percent reduction. Of the 109 reports, 99 identified Shenango as the source of the problem. Monitoring cameras now show a haze-free site with no more grey, black or tan billowing emissions. All monitors are recording a reduction in pollution levels.

 

Anecdotal examples support the improvement. Debbie Blackburn and her family have lived in Ben Avon for more than 19 years and had made plans to move because they could no longer cope with the constant bad air. Both of her sons suffer from autism, a condition studies have shown to be associated with air pollution. They decided to stay after plans to close Shenango were announced in December 2015. Blackburn said now the air is refreshing and “the wind …feels clean against your skin, not gritty and heavy.”

 

Leah Andrascik, an Avalon resident, said with the plant’s closure “a huge weight has been lifted. We can leave windows open overnight without waking to nauseating odors or headaches. Our boys play outside, and I don’t have to cut their play time short because of odors in the neighborhood. We’re optimistic that we’ll be able to stay in the home and community we now can love.”

 

Although the Shenango plant is gone, we continue to be concerned about what DTE Energy will do next with the 50-acre site. We are lobbying hard for replacing Shenango with a solar array facility as DTE Energy is doing at several locations in Michigan and a brownfield site in eastern Pennsylvania.

 

We continue to be watchful of the remaining industries on Neville Island, three of which hold operating permits issued by Allegheny County Health Department based on Environmental Protection Agency regulations. We are concerned about the proposed Shell petrochemical ethane cracker plant in Beaver County and are offering our assistance in the formation of grass roots awareness and activism.

 

Now that Shenango has been closed for a year, we no longer are fearful of the air and water contaminants, measured in tons per year, which spewed into our air and flowed into the Ohio River. Our air and water are cleaner now. We expect that our incidences of cancer and cardiovascular, nervous and respiratory system problems will go down significantly. And we believe our communities will be healthier, more attractive places to live.

 

Thaddeus Popovich,
ACCAN co-founder

 

The opinions expressed in this column are that of the writer, who is responsible for its content.

Comments (4)

  1. Extremely proud to have been a very small part of this project over the last few years. Spending quality time with quality folks was life affirming. Unless you have been a part of this type of endeavor it’s hard to imagine the amount of hours, days, weeks, years, and energies a project of this magnitude takes. In the very beginning there was not any financial assistance. ACCAN eventually networked extensively with environmental agencies and CMU educators to achieve their goals. I personally will be sending this clearly written history to my relatives, and friends who didn’t quite “get” what or why I was doing what I did. From that first gasp of breath – as we enter after our birth to our last breath as we meet our maker – a cleaner environment makes the journey much healthier and longer lasting. Thank you Allegheny County Clean Air and all the hands extended from the other educators and agencies.

  2. Bob Schmetzer says:

    On behalf of all the people who have suffered , THANK YOU !

  3. Debbi Overly says:

    I disagree about the impact on the air being so significant after the plant closing. The air in Avalon, Bellevue, Ben Avon, Emsworth and Ross is still continuously assaulted by wood burning stoves, fireplaces, and fire pits year round. The air burns eyes and throats, causes coughs and ailments like asthma and cancer. A handful of us repeatedly call the fire departments and health department to no avail. Many locals are afraid of backlash from the burners…which is very real…so they keep quiet and close themselves up in their homes. This issue must be addressed now.

  4. Air Quality Advocate says:

    As someone with family in Bellevue, I am so happy for this change. The shift in the air is noticeably different! We need more of these victories and shift in energy, especially in my neighborhood, Forest Hills, which suffers greatly from the plant in Braddock. I hope that one day I too will be able to spend more time outside or have my windows open in the summer.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

events
May 22, 2017
Green City Remix Explores Social Change through Air Quality and Art   Celebrate the first youth designed exhibit at the Senator John Heinz History Center. The Opening Celebration will showcase an art installation crafted by cohorts of high school learners from seven area schools. The students spent several months exploring the … Learn More
May 3, 2017
Physical Activity, Air Pollution and Asthma in the Urban Environment   Making the Connection Series: Physical Activity, Air Pollution and Asthma in the Urban Environment.   Dr. Stephanie Lovinsky-Desir will discuss her research and afterwards there will be a panel of health and community experts to respond to her presentation. … Learn More
April 27, 2017
The People’s Climate March Pittsburgh   The People’s Climate March Pittsburgh will take place in tandem with the march on Washington D.C. from 10 a.m. to noon. Join fellow Pittsburghers in marching for our air, water and land along with clean energy jobs and climate … Learn More
April 25, 2017
Pittsburgh 2030 District Progress Report Reception   Learn about the Green Building Association’s progress in Downtown and Oakland toward achieving emission reduction goals.   April 25, 2017 4-7:00 pm Heinz History Center   Registration required. Learn More
April 25, 2017
Clearing the Air in Clairton   Join Clean Air Council and others for a strategy and goal-setting workshop to identify shared goals in protecting families and children against the risks of industrial pollution.   April 25, 2017 6:30 pm City of Clairton Municipal Building Learn More
April 21, 2017
THRIVE: Sustainable Economy Summit   Learn more about renewable energy, energy efficiency and other aspects of the sustainable economy and help other communities plan sustainable development.   April 21, 2017 9:00 – 4:00 Rustic Lodge Indiana, PA   More information. Learn More
April 20, 2017
Inspire Speaker Series – Dr. John Francis   Inspire Series presents Dr. John Francis, Planetwalker, an environmental justice and civic conversation   April 20, 2017 5:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Elsie H. Hillman Auditorium at Hill House Association.   More Information. Learn More
April 20, 2017
Living Downwind: Personal Stories of Those Harmed by Air Pollution from Neville Island “Living Downwind: Personal Stories of Those Harmed by Air Pollution from Neville Island,” Anchor& Anvil   Join members of ACCAN and community leaders and hear the stories behind the recently released book. More information   Thursday, April 20, 2017 6:30 … Learn More
See all events
latest on facebook

  • Fatal error: Uncaught OAuthException: Error validating application. Application has been deleted. thrown in /nfs/c09/h05/mnt/133684/domains/breatheproject.org/html/wp-content/plugins/facebook-feed-grabber/facebook-sdk/base_facebook.php on line 1254